Sunday, December 16, 2012

In the midst of sorrow, a laugh

The day was sunny and unseasonably warm. We went to a park with three stocked fishing lakes. There were so many fishermen. It seems odd that people are wearing shirt sleeves in mid-December.


It was a perfect day to take a good hike, but I walked around one lake and went back to the car. I'm feeling really sad. This pair of ducks reminded me that we must lean on one another and be there for one another. They swam out to a small island and tucked their heads under their wings. I imagine many people feel the same way after the horrific shooting in Connecticut.







Driving home we saw so many inflatable Santas and snowmen deflated and collapsed on lawns which reminded me of the tiny victims. On the verge of tears I wondered, why are those folks being interviewed, the reporters and even the president, stifling tears? Why are we embarrassed or ashamed to publicly weep and grieve? Why do we permit children to watch violence and then protect them from our emotions?

The best thing about emotions, I tell my students, is that feelings come and go; they don't stay the same. If you are angry or sad, it's okay. You won't stay that way all day. Feelings change. It is okay to feel.

Proof is in the photo above. This inflated sock monkey perched on a roof was like a gift. It made me laugh out loud.

15 comments:

BECKY said...

Such a beautiful post, Linda. I totally agree about showing our feelings, and your students are so fortunate to have you as their teacher! I LOVE the silly sock monkey on the roof. Too funny!!!!

Sioux said...

Linda--I think sometimes the President and other people who are in the public eye stifle their tears because if they don't, they won't be able to stop and they will sob to the point that no one will be able to understand what they say.

A few years ago a family friend--in his early twenties--died of Aids. I spoke at his memorial service and was so overwrought, later, my husband told me "I couldn't understand a thing you said.

You are right. We need to lean on each other, and we need to changes. What changes, I'm not sure.

Kim said...

Last year, I wrote a poem that described the deflated inflatables as fallen soldiers in the war on Christmas.

I made it a point to notice smiles and happy stuff this weekend...and found plenty to let me forget for a little while.

There's still so much good in the world.

Bookie said...

My words might be like tears and once I start I won't stop. So...I cried most of weekend and tears still close to the surface...I can't make sense of all the pain I see. Your post is lovely and true....

Lynn said...

I spoke at my father's funeral and didn't shed a tear, but my brother and other sister spoke and babbled as tears flowed - and you couldn't understand them, so I think that's why some don't... although perhaps the babbling might stay with one longer... who knows. But you're right in what you are telling your little kids in school. Can't even imagine being a parent to the children who were shot.

thisisme said...

Lovely post, and I'm glad that the monkey gave you a laugh. I think we have all been feeling so desperately sad for those poor, innocent little souls. That was such good advice you gave your students.

Chatty Crone said...

God is like the wind - you can feel it, but you can't see it - it is trust.

Susan said...

Hi Linda....I'm with you on feeling deep sorry. So many people are.

It was all so senseless. So heartless and so tragic.

Thanks for your visit and comment on my blog. You are a faithful follower. Susan

Pearl said...

Why, indeed. To me, tears have never been a sign of weakness or embarrassment but a sign of love and strength.

A walk was a good idea. The world is so big, and so full of beauty...

Pearl

Merlesworld said...

I don't mind crying most people cuddle me when I cry and thats always good, the ones that look away are trying to keep control and thats like stoping a leak in a dam it only works for so long.
Merle.........

K9friend said...

Excellent and apt observation, Linda. Too many see an emotional display as weakness. The mantra is always be tough, stay strong.

It's important to know there can be strength in tears, too.

Pat
Critter Alley

Susan Sundwall said...

I love your line, "the best thing about emotions . . . is that feelings come and go." Understanding that goes a long, long way in helping us cope. Great post.

Daisy said...

The sock monkey picture made me smile too. Thanks for sharing it.

Susan J. Reinhardt said...

Years ago, when the zeppelin crashed in Lakehurst, NJ, the reporter wept openly...and got fired. I guess that would give one pause when it comes to expressing emotion.

Personally, I say, "go ahead and cry." Stuffing your feelings is a good way to make yourself very sick.

Kelley Highway said...

Newtown needs us to help them smile again. Twenty little ones and several wise adults we'll never again see would want us all to smile again.

Thank you.
Kelley~