Saturday, August 11, 2012

Lesson from the birds

We just watched a sparrow fly right at our feet and call her baby. She showed the timid little thing how to take a bite of bread from large chunk, but the fledgling tried and tried pecking at the hard crust. The piece was too big. The mama refused to feed the little one but she demonstrated. Then she whisteled encouragement and the little one took dainty little bites and ate till it was full.


That's how I am sometimes, in a hurry. I want the whole thing, don't want to wait, and in my haste I sometimes bite off more than I can chew.

When I was a very little girl I used to call the birds. My dad told me I could catch one if I got close enough to sprinkle Morton salt from the salt box on its tail. My childhood was a great big fantasy ... Monkeys and birds.

16 comments:

Lynn said...

I know all about biting off more than one can chew :-)

Janet Smart said...

That was a neat observation. It is like the saying, don't give them fish to eat, but teach them to fish.
I am always in a hurry, too. My husband says that I am very impatient. He's right.

Joanne Noragon said...

Those mamas certainly look out for the babies. I once saw a mother raccoon teach a youngster that charcoal is not the bag to be ripping apart. He got several swats to hasten him over to the picnic table.

Claudia Moser said...

What a great lesson, thank you for sharing!

Kim said...

When I was 4, I once threw a rock at a bird (and missed). My 14-year old brother told me that the birds were coming to get me, and if I listened I could hear them calling my name...and in my mind, I DID hear them calling accusingly, "Kim, Kim".

I was scared half to death, and never threw another rock near anybody, living or dead.

Lesson learned.

Sioux said...

Linda--Knowing you, I'm sure that--by now--you have whipped up a CS story that has that bird anecdote as the foundation for the "tail."

Bookie said...

Our bird numbers are so diminished! I think house wrens might be gone. Saw a chirpy Carolina wren this morning and some hummingbirds...most are quiet.

Wasn't the morning wonderful? 60 here at 6:30!!!

Susan said...

Hi Linda...
I think most of us often bite off more than we can chew....part of being human, I guess. That mother birdie taught her little one well. Susan

Thisisme. said...

What a great life lesson that mother taught her little baby bird! I think we can all relate to biting off more than we can chew! I love to watch the birds in the garden. Hope your weekend is going well over there.

Tammy said...

That's been one of the hardest things for me as a mother - showing my children rather than just doing it for them, which can be so much easier! Great story. What does the salt do?

Lisa Ricard Claro said...

Guilty as charged. I'm too quick to respond rather than watch and wait. I know that from the moment our little one's are born we should be teaching them how to live without us, but it isn't always an easy thing. Mama's instinct is to protect.

A good quote (don't know who gets the credit) is: If you want to see what your children can achieve, quit giving them things.

Val said...

If I had told my son that tip on bird-catching, which my grandpa told me...he would have rigged up a long-range salt-shooter to test the theory.

K9friend said...

I remember hearing that salt on the tail story, too. Don't know where I picked up that piece of advice.

Pat
Critter Alley

Susan Sundwall said...

If I didn't have such a big mouth I wouldn't always be biting off more than I can chew! Love the birdie story. We could learn a lot from Mama sparrow.

Julia Gordon-Bramer said...

I love birds. There is wisdom even in the tiniest brains!

Donna Volkenannt said...

Birds are fascinating creatures. Such a joy to watch and listen to--except maybe geese who leave messes and are sometimes unfriendly.